If you love Archie Comics, you have to watch our Then...

Channel Frederator

February 21st, 2018

If you love Archie Comics, you have to watch our Then Vs Now: Riverdale

Take a trip down a 79-year old memory lane. http://frdr.us/2BJdtqj

channelfrederator:

The Frederator Studios Tumblr

February 21st, 2018

channelfrederator:

On this day in 1995, What a Cartoon! started on Cartoon Network! 

The short series helped launch shows like The Powerpuff Girls, Johnny Bravo, Cow and Chicken, and many more! Created by Frederator Studios’, @fredseibert

Happy 23rd birthday to The Powerpuff Girls and What a Cartoon!

Watch the Space Ghost Coast to Coast special from February 20, 1995.

On this day in 1995, What a Cartoon! started on Cartoon...

Channel Frederator

February 20th, 2018

On this day in 1995, What a Cartoon! started on Cartoon Network! 

The short series helped launch shows like The Powerpuff Girls, Johnny Bravo, Cow and Chicken, and many more! Created by Frederator Studios’, @fredseibert

fred-frederator-studios:

Frederator Networks

February 20th, 2018

fred-frederator-studios:

Frederator’s 20th Anniversary: 2002-2003

A limited edition postcard for our anniversary, and my limited memory of our years… 

2002 was a year of transition, as we starting adding digital media into our bag of cartoon tricks. 

Frederator  established a strategic partnership with the now defunct Primedia in New York, publishers of hundreds of speciality magazines and new owner of About.com. CEO Tom Rogers asked us to oversee the digital arms of their teen publications like Tiger Beat, 16, and Seventeen. Emil Rensing brought some colleagues from Aol, some of Fred’s media friends came aboard, and we were off to the interactive races. 

image

Inspired by 30 years of Herman Miller’s Summer Picnic Posters and his personal obsession, Fred inaugurated an annual New Year’s poster, the first one by Los Angeles designer Patrick Raske.

image

By 2003 we were humming along. Early in the year Frederator Studios got a 4th Nickelodeon pick-up. Rob Renzetti –a special creative relationship dating back to my Hanna-Barbera days– created My Neighbor was a Teenage Robot as the sixth of his six Oh Yeah! shorts and it morphed into a big fan favorite, My Life as a Teenage Robot, with Alex Kirwan as Rob’s creative partner and art director. Eric Homan returned West to set up the production. 

image

ChalkZone was in it’s second season of production. 

And, thanks to Emil’s idea to start the first production blogs from a network series, The Teenage Roblog, MLaaTR has a loyal fan base that’s stayed active into this decade. 

image

Eric developed a relationship with Mexican born artist and  creator/director Jorge Gutierrez who provided us with a uniquely stunning entry into our now annual New Year’s poster

image

And, without a shorts incubator in production, I missed the regular flow of postcards. Our friends Sean Adams and Noreen Morioka of AdamsMorioka/Los Angeles (designers of the Frederator logotype) stepped up and agreed to design an entire series (#4). Problem solved. 

More to come. 

Artwork from the top: Frederator postcards Series 42.1; 2002 poster by Patrick Raske; My Life as a Teenage Robot poster: Art direction: Alex Kirwan, Designed & illustrated by Jill Friemark; BoschZone by Frank Rocco; 2003 poster by Jorge Gutierrez; Frederator postcard No. 13 by AdamsMorioka

 …..

From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 300 people
to receive this limited edition
Frederator postcard!

www.frederator.com

20 Years of Frederator
1998 - 2018

Series 42.1 [mailed out February 16, 2018]

©2018, Frederator Networks, Inc.
A WOW! Unlimited Media Company. All rights reserved.

image

fred-frederator-studios:

The Frederator Studios Tumblr

February 20th, 2018

fred-frederator-studios:

Frederator’s 20th Anniversary: 2002-2003

A limited edition postcard for our anniversary, and my limited memory of our years… 

2002 was a year of transition, as we starting adding digital media into our bag of cartoon tricks. 

Frederator  established a strategic partnership with the now defunct Primedia in New York, publishers of hundreds of speciality magazines and new owner of About.com. CEO Tom Rogers asked us to oversee the digital arms of their teen publications like Tiger Beat, 16, and Seventeen. Emil Rensing brought some colleagues from Aol, some of Fred’s media friends came aboard, and we were off to the interactive races. 

image

Inspired by 30 years of Herman Miller’s Summer Picnic Posters and his personal obsession, Fred inaugurated an annual New Year’s poster, the first one by Los Angeles designer Patrick Raske.

By 2003 we were humming along. Early in the year Frederator Studios got a 4th Nickelodeon pick-up. Rob Renzetti –a special creative relationship dating back to my Hanna-Barbera days– created My Neighbor was a Teenage Robot as the sixth of his six Oh Yeah! shorts and it morphed into a big fan favorite, My Life as a Teenage Robot, with Alex Kirwan as Rob’s creative partner and art director. Eric Homan returned West to set up the production. 

ChalkZone was in it’s second season of production. 

And, thanks to Emil’s idea to start the first production blogs from a network series, The Teenage Roblog, MLaaTR has a loyal fan base that’s stayed active into this decade. 

Eric developed a relationship with Mexican born artist and  creator/director Jorge Gutierrez who provided us with a uniquely stunning entry into our now annual New Year’s poster

And, without a shorts incubator in production, I missed the regular flow of postcards. Our friends Sean Adams and Noreen Morioka of AdamsMorioka/Los Angeles (designers of the Frederator logotype) stepped up and agreed to design an entire series (#4). Problem solved. 

More to come. 

Artwork from the top: Frederator postcards Series 42.1; 2002 poster by Patrick Raske; My Life as a Teenage Robot poster: Art direction: Alex Kirwan, Designed & illustrated by Jill Friemark; BoschZone by Frank Rocco; 2003 poster by Jorge Gutierrez; Frederator postcard No. 13 by AdamsMorioka

 …..

From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 300 people
to receive this limited edition
Frederator postcard!

www.frederator.com

20 Years of Frederator
1998 - 2018

Series 42.1 [mailed out February 16, 2018]

©2018, Frederator Networks, Inc.
A WOW! Unlimited Media Company. All rights reserved.

Frederator’s 20th Anniversary: 2002-2003A limited edition postcard for our anniversary, and...

Fred Seibert's Tumblr

February 20th, 2018

Frederator’s 20th Anniversary: 2002-2003

A limited edition postcard for our anniversary, and my limited memory of our years… 

2002 was a year of transition, as we starting adding digital media into our bag of cartoon tricks. 

Frederator  established a strategic partnership with the now defunct Primedia in New York, publishers of hundreds of speciality magazines and new owner of About.com. CEO Tom Rogers asked us to oversee the digital arms of their teen publications like Tiger Beat, 16, and Seventeen. Emil Rensing brought some colleagues from Aol, some of Fred’s media friends came aboard, and we were off to the interactive races. 

image

Inspired by 30 years of Herman Miller’s Summer Picnic Posters and his personal obsession, Fred inaugurated an annual New Year’s poster, the first one by Los Angeles designer Patrick Raske.

image

By 2003 we were humming along. Early in the year Frederator Studios got a 4th Nickelodeon pick-up. Rob Renzetti –a special creative relationship dating back to my Hanna-Barbera days– created My Neighbor was a Teenage Robot as the sixth of his six Oh Yeah! shorts and it morphed into a big fan favorite, My Life as a Teenage Robot, with Alex Kirwan as Rob’s creative partner and art director. Eric Homan returned West to set up the production. 

image

ChalkZone was in it’s second season of production. 

And, thanks to Emil’s idea to start the first production blogs from a network series, The Teenage Roblog, MLaaTR has a loyal fan base that’s stayed active into this decade. 

image

Eric developed a relationship with Mexican born artist and  creator/director Jorge Gutierrez who provided us with a uniquely stunning entry into our now annual New Year’s poster

image

And, without a shorts incubator in production, I missed the regular flow of postcards. Our friends Sean Adams and Noreen Morioka of AdamsMorioka/Los Angeles (designers of the Frederator logotype) stepped up and agreed to design an entire series (#4). Problem solved. 

More to come. 

Artwork from the top: Frederator postcards Series 42.1; 2002 poster by Patrick Raske; My Life as a Teenage Robot poster: Art direction: Alex Kirwan, Designed & illustrated by Jill Friemark; BoschZone by Frank Rocco; 2003 poster by Jorge Gutierrez; Frederator postcard No. 13 by AdamsMorioka

 …..

From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 300 people
to receive this limited edition
Frederator postcard!

www.frederator.com

20 Years of Frederator
1998 - 2018

Series 42.1 [mailed out February 16, 2018]

©2018, Frederator Networks, Inc.
A WOW! Unlimited Media Company. All rights reserved.

image

adventuretime:

The Frederator Studios Tumblr

February 19th, 2018

adventuretime:

Pen, your mind has been transported back in time, and to Mars.

Happy Presidents’ Day.

Abraham Lincoln was a President in real life, FYI.

Pen, your mind has been transported back in time, and to Mars.

Pendleton Ward's Cartoon Tumblr

February 19th, 2018

Pen, your mind has been transported back in time, and to Mars.

Happy Presidents’ Day.

Meet Liz Chun, Creator of (not)Hero

The Frederator Studios Tumblr

February 19th, 2018

cartoonhangover:

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the world?

Yes! I just want to say how grateful I am to Frederator for this amazing opportunity. I really hope people enjoy watching (not)Hero!

On a completely random tangent, despite the end of their perfect winning streak, I strongly believe that Seoul Dynasty will make a comeback and win the Overwatch League. After all, the Ace Attorney series taught us that perfection isn’t everything. Go Dynasty!

Thanks for sharing, Liz! You can watch (not)Hero on Cartoon Hangover Select on VRV: http://frdr.us/YTCHnotHero

image

Liz Chun started at Frederator as an intern. Now, she is the creator of (not)Hero on Cartoon Hangover! (not)Hero: Heromy is destined to be the kingdom’s hero from birth, except there’s one problem: Heromy doesn’t want to be ANYBODY’s hero. He just wants to bake banana cream pies and mostly avoid other people. But when the terrible villainess, Missie, arrives to obliterate his face, he has to confront his destiny. Or maybe run away. He’ll probably just run away. If you love video games, witty humor, and cats, this cartoon is for you! Learn more about Liz Chun and (not)Hero:

What would be on your character description if you were in a video game? What are your special abilities? What’s your origin story?

Ooh, if I was in a video game I’d probably be a weird NPC that you encounter on a trading quest. So my description would probably be something like…

“A strange girl who lives in an underground cave. Liz has requested that you bring her a photo of a rare cat in exchange for a secret on how to increase your health.”

Then if I got that picture I wanted, I’d hand over some weird herbal tea that tastes awful but increases your health incrementally. (Does that count as a special ability?)

My origins would be unknown, but little easter eggs would reveal that I sailed to the main continent of the game from a strange land with many avocados.

image

Is (not)Hero the first show you’ve created?

Yes, it’s my first one! It’s been an amazing experience that started with an internship at Frederator, one wonderful (but really frigid) winter in NYC. I’m so grateful for everything that I’ve been able to learn through Frederator from then until now and onwards. They’re the nicest!

How did you come up with the concept for the show?

I actually came up with the concept while I was interning at Frederator! They encouraged us interns to try pitching ideas if we were interested. At the time the weather was really cold, so I was spending a lot of time inside playing games.

One night I was playing and thinking of how fun it would be to be the protagonist of a game. Then I hit a rough spot and kept dying. Over and over and over again, haha.

That changed my mind. I decided being a video game hero would be awful and used that chain of thought to create (not)Hero, which is about the protagonist of a game who really doesn’t want the job. It’s too much pressure!

image

Is the written language in (not)Hero actually readable?

Uh…so, embarrassing story! It was originally upside-down Korean but then I misspelled something and now it doesn’t make sense. So kind of readable but kind of not…

(not)Hero has some great references to games like Zelda and Pokemon. Are there any Easter Eggs or special tidbits that you’re excited for fans to find?

Yeah! There are a lot of references to a lot of different things. I tried to make them subtle and now I’m worried I went too far with that. I guess we’ll see!

There’s a reference in the second episode to a game that I’m into a lot right now, so I was excited to squeeze that in there…but my favorite is probably a Pokemon reference in the third!

Are there any plans to make (not)Hero a playable video game in some form?

That’d be so cool! I’m not the best at coding, but maybe some day…

I’ll just have to wait until people can make games just by thinking about them. But by then the robots might already take over…

image

Do you consider yourself to be a “gamer”?

Would Solid Snake consider himself to be a master of CQC?!  I love me some video games, so I guess the answer to that is yes!

What are some of your favorite games? What have you been playing recently?

Ack, there are so many amazing games to pick from! Ocarina of Time is my tried and true favorite, but more recently I’ve really enjoyed Overwatch, Breath of the Wild, and Persona 5. Then there’s my dreaded backlog which consists of Nioh (it has a cat that’s a clock!), Yakuza 0, Nier:Automata, and a million other games. It never ends!

Overcooked is a great multiplayer, but it will destroy your friendships.

You can choose any fantastical real world power-up and it lasts for 24 hours. What would it be?

I’ve thought about this question a lot, but not with the 24 hour stipulation. If you hadn’t put that in I’d have the easy and selfish answer of teleportation to avoid traffic! But if it’s only 24 hours, then I’ll go with the altruistic choice of super human intelligence for the sake of figuring out as many solutions to the world’s major problems as I can in that span of time.

image

We hear you have a fluffy cat. Does he help you create cartoons?

He’s so fluffy! In one way he helps because squishing his belly makes all my stress melt away. There is also this profound wisdom in his eyes that you can see when you stare really deeply into them. It makes you feel more secure with your place in the universe.

On the other hand, he likes to roll around on anything that I’m using to work whether it’s my keyboard or a sheet of paper, which is kind of a hindrance…especially when he ends up turning off my monitor. That’s really inconvenient when I’m doing stuff.

Are we living in a simulation?

If we are, I hope I figure out how to hack it soon. Then maybe I can have more cats. And a deeper understanding of my existence?

image

What’s your favorite food and why?

I LOVE FOOD. So this changes a lot. Right now it’s just…bread. (Milk toast to be precise!) There’s a chain of bakeries in SoCal called 85°C Bakery Cafe and I’m there more than I should be…

I love bread because it is versatile. Bread is a food of infinite possibilities!

What kind of stuff inspires you? Shows? Games? Artists? Places?

This is a hard question because I feel like just about everything I’ve encountered in life has inspired me in one way or another. I don’t know how to condense that list down! I think I’m most inspired by the real-world people, places, and things around me. Because life is strange, haha.

Any other projects or ventures that you’ve been working on lately?

I’ve been trying to “git gud” at Overwatch (and there’s some youth lingo I picked up), but I don’t think it’s working! I’ve also been thinking up some new ideas. Maybe a high-octane action film starring my cat as the only pure and good thing in a post-apocalyptic world overrun by mutant grasshoppers?

Do you have any sites or pages where people can follow you?

Admittedly, I’m not the best at social media. I have a very inactive Tumblr (elizathechun.tumblr.com), which hasn’t been used since I interned for Frederator…but wait! I also have an Instagram account (@piratekingfrancis) for my cat. The latter is definitely more up to date. Priorities.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the world?

Yes! I just want to say how grateful I am to Frederator for this amazing opportunity. I really hope people enjoy watching (not)Hero!

On a completely random tangent, despite the end of their perfect winning streak, I strongly believe that Seoul Dynasty will make a comeback and win the Overwatch League. After all, the Ace Attorney series taught us that perfection isn’t everything. Go Dynasty!

Thanks for sharing, Liz! You can watch (not)Hero on Cartoon Hangover Select on VRV: http://frdr.us/VRVCHnotHero

Sure, Liz split Frederator a while back, but she soon learned you can check out of Frederator, but you can never leave. Hats off to Liz and Frederator Digital on their solid new Cartoon Hangover series, (not)Hero.

fred-frederator-studios:

Frederator Networks

February 18th, 2018

fred-frederator-studios:

Frederator’s 20th Anniversary: 1998-2001 

I promised to post a few Frederator highlights looking back from our 20th year

Our first few years were dominated by figuring out how to be independent again. After five years with Hanna-Barbera and working for Turner Broadcasting running Hanna-Barbera, figuring out how to get my own thing going took a little while. 

image

1998 was the year we debuted our first cartoon show, Oh Yeah! Cartoons on Nickelodeon. When we wrapped the season, the party poster had a last minute tongue in cheek joke that inadvertently set the promise for Frederator Studios: “Original Cartoons since 1998.” 

Frederator itself existed completely to the beneficence of Herb Scannell and Albie Hecht at Nickelodeon and Tom Freston and Judy McGrath at Nick’s parent, MTV Networks. We’d all worked together for a decade before I decamped to Hanna-Barbera, and when Ted Turner sold his company they kindly asked me back to make cartoons and consult on programming issues at their company. 

On the first day it was just me and Stephanie Stephens in a temporary conference room in North Hollywood. Our building was right next to what would soon be a notorious bank robbery shootout, and within weeks we were joined by my Hanna-Barbera collaborator Larry Huber, and a teenage Alex Kirwan in his first full time production job, both ready to tackle Oh Yeah! (Steve Hillenburg was in the same space as us, working hard on some pilot about a sponge.)  Within the year, Eric Homan had had it at Warner Bros. Animation Art and joined up for what’s turned out to be an amazing partnership, first to help develop properties from our short lived time at the helm of the Kitchen Sink Press, and then onto more cartoon-y pursuits. 

Oh Yeah! was my second cartoon shorts incubator, taking up where the Hanna-Barbera back-to-the-future experiment, Cartoon Network’s What A Cartoon!, left off. All together the shorts featured 34 original creators and 99 original cartoons. Right from the go it spawned two hit series, Larry Huber’s and Bill Burnett’s ChalkZone and Butch Hartman’s The Fairly OddParents, quickly followed by Rob Renzetti’s My Life as a Teenage Robot. Several of the other creators stayed in Frederator’s circle of talent for the next two decades.   

image

1999 

Frederator looked everywhere for creators. During our first years, most worked in the Los Angeles animation industry, and many came from right within the Oh Yeah! crew. Mike Bell was a writer on Dave Wasson’s Tales from the Goose Lady and went on to create Super Santa and The Forgotten Toybox; Tim Biskup was a Season 1 background designer. Co-executive producer Larry Huber had worked in the cartoon business since the 1960’s. Alex Kirwan had been a high school student who won a contest we had at H&B. I was lucky that many –Hartman, Burnett, Moncrief, Thompson, Renzetti, Ventura, Eng, MacFarlane– came over with me from Hanna-Barbera. On the other hand, Pennsylvania based David Burd worked with me at MTV back in the day.

This season we also got introduced to our first tween creator, 12 year old John Reynolds on his Terry and Chris short, with a story, design, and directing assist from Butch Hartman. A grown up John has become a member in good standing in the Los Angeles animation industry. 

2000-2001 

Frederator Studios took a short break while I moved my family to New York from Los Angeles. Eric Homan took the plunge with me and we leapt into the brave new world that was the consumer internet, when I became president of MTV Networks’ online division with MTV.com, Nick.com, ComedyCentral.com among others. 

But cartoons cannot be stopped! Frederator’s Nickelodeon cartoons took their next steps with the start of series production based on Butch Hartman’s Oh Yeah! short, The Fairly OddParents and Bill Burnett’s and Larry Huber’s ChalkZone (March 22, 2002). Debuting March 30, 2001, FOP would go on to a record run of 16 years (as of 2018) and counting.

Critically, this was the period it dawned on me that I no longer had it in me to be a good corporate employee. But the internet bug had hit squarely and I saw Frederator's future. Quickly, we set up shop as Frederator/New York with computer engineer and visionary Emil Rensing, and trolled around for some work. 

We set ourselves up as frederator.kz out of Kazakhstan. It seemed less, um, common.

Little noted, and against the advice of counsel, was the addition to our team of a self taught engineer intern, high school freshman David Karp

image

Frederator limited edition postcards

This period was where we started our tradition of Frederator limited edition postcards. The first three series (the “series” designation didn’t actually start for a few years) were the Oh Yeah! seasons, and a few non-series snuck in there too. One of the Frederator/NY clients was MTV’s new acquisition, the former Nashville Network they’d rebranded as TNN: The National Network. We threw some Frederator t-shirts along with David Ramage when he went across the country proving the channel was indeed national. 

More to come…

Artwork from the top: Frederator’s first announcement illustrated and designed by Arlen Schumer, color by Patrick Raske; Oh Yeah! posters by Hatch Show Print, Nashville; Oh Yeah! Cartoons limited edition sericel, creative direction by Eric Homan; Oh Yeah! postcard, Series 3, 2000

image
    • about-contact us
    • Frederator Networks
    • TV series
    • channel frederator badge
    • Cartoon Hangover
    • Leaderboard
    • CF Network
    • Atomo
    • Galleries




















































































  • Adventure Time, and all associated graphics © 2009-2013 Cartoon Network. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.

    ChalkZone, The Fairly Oddparents, Fanboy & Chum Chum, Nickelodeon, My Life as a Teenage Robot, Oh Yeah! Cartoons, Random! Cartoons, and all associated graphics © 1998-2013, Viacom Intl. All Rights Reserved.

    The views and opinions expressed on this blog belong to Fred Seibert, Frederator Studios, Bellport Cartoons, Inc., JoeJack, Inc., FS Holdings 2005, Inc., Frederator Networks, Inc. and/or WOW! Unlimited Media, Inc. and do not necessarily reflect the views of Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, Time-Warner, Turner Broadcasting, Viacom Intl., MTV Networks, or The Empire.

    Bellport Cartoon Company, Broadway Frederator Networks, Channel Frederator, Channel Frederator Network, Cartoon Hangover, Frederator Books, Frederator Studios, Frederator Networks © 1998-2018, Frederator Networks, Inc. A Wow! Unlimited Media Company. All rights reserved.